What’s Happening in Obscurity?

Middle School Girls

(Deeper Into the Woods – And Out the Other Side)

In the rural area where I live, high school is often the high point of society.  School popularity and status are hard fought attainments.  They color a large part of the rest of your life if you remain.  And sports events comprise the predominant community activity.  The arc of a life is often to begin playing sports as a youngster; realize the height of your success in high school; marry, have kids and start them in sports; attend all their games and argue with the other parents about coaches and playing times in order to help your child reach the arc of their lives.  (What with Title IX, this occurs rather frequently now among both sexes.)  Then it’s grandchildren, a proud family tradition, and finally history.

Sports events are the engine which both runs community activity and provides social transportation.  The high school alumni vie very hard to having winning seasons.  Like pro clubs, they recruit promising athletes from outside their districts.  Move them in with local relatives – or sometimes an entire family will uproot themselves to help the athletic advancement of a particular promising member.  Fathers (and mothers) lose sleep over mistakes made during middle school football or basketball, or wrestling…

Suffice to say, star high school athletes take on a celebrity status – whether they will it or not.

Recently, at a family get together, a current high school star’s girlfriend was complaining about a swarm of stalking middle school girls, and particularly one who would not quit texting her boyfriend.  These middle school girls will often try to get their pictures taken with the athletes at games, (often with the help of their mothers).  They assume familiarity.  They build a web of salacious rumors.  They create drama.  They fuel one another.  This particular “psycho”, (as the star’s girlfriend referred to the 14 year old), had texted her athlete boyfriend.  The boy pleaded with her to stop texting.  “Can’t we just talk?” she texted.

The young athlete has tried blocking her calls, but through some app she is able to assume another phone number.  So that now he has seven or eight blocked numbers on his phone all labeled “stalker”.  Given the age differences, any physical proximity would be legally perilous.  So he’s shelved notions of dropping by to talk to her parents.  Going to the police is an escalation, perhaps to be avoided.  Recently the girl visited his girlfriend at her worksite, then phoned in a withering customer performance review.  His girlfriend investigated the number on the complaint, tracing it back to the young “psycho”.  After much back and forth texting, with the girlfriend asking her repeatedly to just go away – the girl texted, “Can’t we just talk?”

The scenario brings to mind Hollywood and the celebrities who are stalked by the tabloids, which are constantly vying to give their readers some association with fame and glamour.

On a darker note this tale brings to mind “The Crucible”, playwright Arthur Miller’s recreation of the terrors a group of dissembling young girls was able to visit upon the Puritan colony of Salem.

Photo taken from Google Images

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