Posts Tagged ‘fashion’

From the Editor’s Perch…

September 2, 2014

Teenager3

Question Rebellion

 

It has been found that when blind-from-birth persons have had their sight restored by operative means, they don’t automatically ‘see’ like you or I.  These newly sighted people have to learn what the various colors and shades of light coming in through their eyes mean.  They must walk around and explore the world in order to recognize what a ‘chair’ is, for example.  Then, they can understand what a chair ‘looks like’.  It seems experience of the world is necessary before we can understand what the perceptions we have mean.

 

It has been widely recognized that as people age, they generally become more conservative.  It has also been noted, in this recent article “Why Won’t They Listen?” by William Saletan in the New York Times, (which is a review of the book The Righteous Mind: Why Good People Are Divided by Politics and Religion by Jonathan Haidt), that “Conservatism thrives because it fits how people think, and that’s what validates it.”  Minds are like eyes.  They must ‘learn’ to ‘think’.  They must learn to ‘see’ what is there.

 

Saletan goes on to note that whereas Conservatives tend to base their convictions on 6 moral foundations (including faith, patriotism, valor, chastity, law and order), Liberals “focus almost entirely on care and fighting oppression” (my italics).  Because of this, he goes on to note, Conservatives most often can understand what Liberals are arguing (because of their wider moral stance), but Liberals often cannot make sense of Conservatives (because of their narrower moral stance).

Teenager1

In my own world I’ve often heard liberals scorn the ‘hypocrisy of Conservatives’.   They would do better to scorn the hypocrisy of thought – or of reality in toto.  A true evaluation usually contains a dark side.  Nearly any effort suffers ‘unintended consequences’.  Liberals seem especially poor at discerning this.  They are like actors who cannot grasp the subtext.  They seem to prefer living in a world where if there is a problem hole, filling the hole will solve the problem.   In the real world something caused the hole, and will cause there to be a hole again.  This is what Conservatives would like to discuss with them.  But a Liberal will say, “You say you hate holes, but here you are, refusing to fill them.”  To which a Conservative might answer, “Filling the hole will not make it go away.”  This dumbfounds the Liberal.  ‘How can filling a hole NOT make it go away?  A child could understand this!’
Teenager2

Exactly.

 

In lieu of gathered wisdom, Liberals often dismiss Conservatism as representing a particularly nasty side of humanity.  Rarely a day goes by that I do not hear the grumbling of some Liberal that they are just giving up on talking to any more idiotic, brutal, blind, closed-minded, and greedy, Neanderthal Conservatives.   And if I am lucky enough, within the same day, to meet with a fellow Conservative, I’m mostly likely to see a shake of the head, whenever they speak of Liberals with chagrin, and a response somewhat of the retort, “They are like children!”.

 

Living as a ‘declared’ Conservative can be lonely, isolating and quite trying experience, rather like a beleaguered parent.   You feel like a piece of hanging meat being pestered by flies.

 

 

And trying to get on in a world where there are people, who would fashion themselves as Progressives  – shopping for their politics at the only the best stores – this is the Conservatives burden.  ‘Progressive’  is a name brand which declares its own infallibility.  Progressives walk around in designer thoughts, bemoaning all of the unwashed; while swearing at the odd Conservative as if stubbing their toe on a chair they cannot comprehend and spilling their Kool Aid.  They don’t care that you don’t agree with what they think – or drink.  What offends them is that you can’t recognize extremely fine fashion when you see it.

 

But we Conservatives DO recognize fashion.  We just feel that life requires practical, tested measures.

 

A Conservative might hope Liberals would take advice from their own ecological laments and realize culture is a profoundly complex thing best left to grow organically; that culture is an accretion of collected individual wisdom best tended within a wisely structured environment of what lawyers call ‘natural law’, and is not something to be corrected and rearranged at intellectual whim.  That you can kill things this way; completely destroy a habitat.  (As Ronald Reagan noted, civilization is fragile as an eggshell.)  But they don’t.  They keep importing their intellectual kudzu and disseminating it as far as able.  As Saletan points out in his article, they destroy ‘moral capital’.

 

After a day of trying to get through to these modern day knuckleheads, a Conservative can be sorely tempted to wander off by themselves for awhile, sit on a rock and pray.

Pictures taken from Google Images

 

 

 

 

 

From the Editor’s Perch…

April 25, 2014

Japanese Combine Fireworks and Female Action Figure

You’ll either find this hysterically funny or be quite offended.  Either way, it is kind of a jaw dropper:

 

From the Editor’s Perch…

January 12, 2014

Lady Gaga2

Fashion

 

            In the book, Fascism versus Capitalism, Llwellyn Rockwell Jr. mentions the Harvard philosopher, Santayana’s observation “that ideas aren’t usually abandoned because they have been refuted; they are abandoned when they become unfashionable.”  Most people reading this who have tried to introduce an unfashionable notion probably have suffered this observation.  You either find yourself socially isolated.   Or you are made to feel as if you are speaking in a foreign tongue, as if, as a woman at a theater rehearsal once told me (regarding my thoughts):  “I feel as if I am talking to someone from the moon.”  Thoughts judged to be unfashionable are simply left to die alone while conversing to the backs and sides of heads, and thence to float away, detached and withered, into the cold outer reaches.

The most dramatic example I’ve run across of this phenomenon is from the same book as mentioned above.  Henry Hazlitt was an editorial writer for the New York Times from 1934 till 1945 who backed a return to the gold standard.  He was finally sacked for his editorials in opposition to the Breton Woods agreement of 1945 establishing the World Bank.   Hazlitt wrote: “it would be difficult to think of a more serious threat to world stability and full production than the continual prospect of a uniform world inflation to which the politicians of every country would be so easily tempted.”  Throughout his tenure, no one, as far as can be seen, joined him in his warnings.  He could not even generate a credible opposition.  His opposition around the Breton Woods agreement ignored him, claiming a world catastrophe if the measure were not passed.

History has proved Henry Hazlitt correct.  And millions of lives perhaps need not have been lost to the devastations of WWII if the advent of rampant inflation had not been there to fuel the rise of fascist philosophies.  But no matter.  WWII did occur.  The Times has never apologized.  (Don’t hold your breath!)  And Henry Hazlitt lost his job.  John Maynard Keynes ideas appeared to be new.  Henry Hazlitt’s appeared to be old.  To be included in a current conversation you must be perceived to be ‘new’ – otherwise, the argument goes, why have one?   Though there was no factual basis of incompetence for firing Henry Hazlitt, by 1945 the Times publisher,  Arthur Sulzberger, “had had enough.”  “When 43 governments sign an agreement, I don’t see how the Times can any longer combat this,” he said.

 

“How important is sound money?  The whole of civilization depends on it,” says Llewellyn Rockwell.  Nevertheless, fashion trumps it.

 

            If these anecdotes don’t arouse you, then I give up.  I can’t reach you with a sharp pin.

 

But fashion itself is a fascinating topic.  It seems to move and change on its own timeline, without regard for events.  (Which, I would suppose is as we should expect, given its impervious nature.)  In my younger years I lived in a home I’d purchased on the cheap in the Rainier Valley area of Seattle.   This section of Seattle contained (and still does) the most diversified population in terms of race and ethnicity of any area in King County.  While I lived there, gang violence was endemic.  I still remember my neighbor arguing loudly in the middle of our street with his son not to join the gang which was waiting for him on the corner.  I had passed the years watching this decent kid grow from a toddler, to the middle school aged youngster who now apparently had been judged old enough to join the gang.  I also remember a neighborhood friend relating the tale of going to pick up her son at school and having to hug the floor of her car outside of the school to escape the exchange of bullets passing overhead.  Our community and the city government tried this and they tried that.  Then, after it seemed I had given up hope and had moved on anyway, it just ended.  No more violence.  No more gangs on the corner.  And yet everything else was the same.  Same people.  Same laws.  Same police.   Same homes.  Same everything.  Only the people who did that sort of thing, didn’t do it anymore.  As near as I could tell, it just passed out of fashion.

Photo is Lady Gaga from Google Images

From the Editor’s Perch…

June 23, 2012

 

Does Art Make You a Better Person?

A lot of people, mostly artists I’ve noticed, say it does.   And it’s usually only artists – or people in arts related careers, who are pitching for a fuller revenue stream  – who broach this topic.  You rarely hear of a lawyer, or a garbage collector, or a plumber, or a cop, or a mayor, or any of any number of professions raise this question about themselves.  They seem to take it for granted that being paid for doing something useful is worthwhile, and hopefully, that participating in life in this capacity makes them a better person.  But it may not.  That’s the way it goes.  A person has to get the food on the table. 

However, artists have a lot of trouble even ‘getting food to the table’.  So another reason to justify doing what they are doing seems necessary.  Personally, I would keep looking for a reason, because I haven’t seen the theater turning out superior persons.  Mostly it makes them like gambling addicts who will squander their last few dollars to create a hit.  Their relationships founder; their lawns are not mown;  weeds abound in the flower beds, their homes tilt; the children either aren’t conceived or grow up a little funny, and financially the whole consortium dances right along the edge.  Actors and writers maintain that assuming the personalities of a variety of characters gives them insight into the human condition.  What I see is that it adds quite a little arrogance to their own condition.  We are always writing/acting ourselves.  Who’s kidding who?  It’s as plain as the nose on our faces – which doesn’t change.  Has art made me a better person?  I can’t say it has.  But age, and life, may have formed me a bit.

How About Beer?

But has beer made me a better person?   I can’t say it has, either.  But I enjoy it.  And so I enjoy art.  I enjoy making it.  I enjoy watching and listening and experiencing it.  I enjoy talking about it.  And like most artists, I figure out a method  of paying my way.   Isn’t that enough?  

Photo by Carl Nelson of John Ruoff/Mime

Addendum:  “There are, of course, more important things than art:  life itself, what actually happens to you.  This may sound silly, but I have to say it, given what I’ve heard art-silly people say all my life…  Art shouldn’t be overrated.”  – Clement Greenberg

Seattle Celebrity News!

March 16, 2012

Noted Local Fashion Photographer is Switching to

INSECTS!

Regular Models and Actors are Getting to be a “Pain in the Ass”, he says.

 

 Editor:  The Seattle Fashion Community is all abuzz after the recent declaration by one of its leading photographers that he now intends to use insects and ‘bugs’ to replace human models and actors in his upcoming fashion shoots.  “Your average person knows that he or she can never hope to equal what a professional photographer can do with props, professional staging/make-up/lighting… and what we can’t do, that we accomplish with Photoshop.  Your average person is not made to feel better by looking at all these ads.  Quite the opposite!  We as professionals dedicate our days to making your average person  feel like a failure; like they can never measure up.  So, in part, it’s a moral decision,” he told The Seattle Celebrity News! during a recent interview.  “Plus they work for crumbs,” he added.  Read on to hear more:

Seattle Celebrity News! (SCN!):  So you feel that insects more objectify our present human state then?

Noted Local Fashion Photographer (NLFP):  That’s right.  They ARE the 99.999999999999999%

SCN!:  Can’t insects be hard to work with?

NLFP:  I’ve never had one talk back or refuse a task.  You treat them right and they’ll literally walk the extra mile for you.  And they don’t mind sharing a little of the rewards with the other workers in the industry.  Why, just as an example, we used a fairly non-descript, kind of an Everyman bug for a series of motivational posters I was creating for a large hedgefund, which operates out of Brussels.  Now this bug, I’ll call him “Bob”, lost one of his rear legs partway through the shoot.  Did he call Labor and Industries?  Was his agent and/or lawyer there and on my back in a nanosecond?  No.  He didn’t make a peep.  It was Continuity who picked up on it!  Said he had five more good legs, and that the other would grow back in time, anyways.  We wrapped that puppy without any further disruption.  The client was very happy with the result.  Bugs have that ‘can-do’, hive mentality which the clients appreciate.  They can’t tell you what it is, but I see it in the lens everyday.  It’s the authenticity.  ‘Bob’ is one of those guys who walks the walk.  But there are others.

SCN!:  What about modelling clothes, and such?

NLFP:  Well, they’ve got 6 legs, or more! you know.  That’s a lot of leg, and a lot of shoes.  Antennae are great to hang accessories on.  And, I’ve got to say, for some reason those Ladybugs just LOVE the little handbags.  In fact, they keep wandering away from the properties room.  I don’t know how they’re doing that…

SCN!:  Where do you find your talent?

NLFP:  More often than not they just wander in off the lot.  You wouldn’t believe the amount of real talent out there.  Of course, there’s always the stars.  The ones who have that certain something.

SCN!:  Could you give us some hints on some up-and-comers? 

NLFP:  Well, there’s this almost transparent green aphid who is really causing some buzz amongst the lighting people.  And then there’s my personal favorite: this Ladybug I call Emily.  But that’s as far as I want to say at this time.

SCN!:  Well, might we talk to you again, sometime?

NLFP:  Sure.  Drop by in 3 or 4 months and I think you’ll be amazed.

SCN!:  I’ll bring my reading glasses.

NLFP:  Good choice.

While we were there, one of the newer talents was positioning herself for a screentest.

SCN! photos by Carl Nelson

Fashion with Chris

February 28, 2011

After a lot of work, here they are: my final words on the Elvis Invitational.

 

Elvis Invitational Wrap-Up

 

” A bold addition to the classic splashy white jumpsuit is multiple old glory scarves (hey, where’s the blue?) & … a moustache?! Elvis as gigolo!!! The movie he forgot to make!”

"Back view of Robert (no bad sides on this guy!)"

“Torso of ultra (23 years) pro Robert Washington. THIS is how ya do it!”

 

 

"Mike D. fronts the Graceland Five. Enough said."

 

"Fringe & a determined sneer are de rigeur!"

 

"Jim Dever shows off the Stay Puft Marshmelvis look!!!"

 

 

"Add B-Side Elvis & you got a black- clad stingin' good time!!"

 



" If the only costume ya gots is a t-shirt, make sure to have a phalanx of dancin' cuties!"

 

"The ultimate accoutrement! Peter "The Colonel" Verbrugge holds up the champ's belt. Ronnie Porter wears it this year."

 

Thank y’all very much…

Photos by Carl Nelson

"Emily Cappel as Money Honey, a show unto herself"

Fashion with Chris

February 23, 2011

Editor’s Note:  A lot of you have been getting upset about our lapsed coverage of the Elvis Invitationals.  Sorry!  We had to interrupt our coverage for breaking news.  But here is the denouement you’ve all been waiting for…  Except that first we want to post a bit of the dress standard for the event.  Start planning! those of you who are planning to attend next year’s event.

Elvis Invitational Audience Dress Standards

A Bit of Haute Coutre Showed Up

Formal Attire

Eclectic Goth Rockabilly

The Well-Heeled Were There

Everyone Wanted to Touch These to See If The Little Black Things Were Bumpy

Meow!

Court Jester to The King

And finally: Let's Give It Up for the Lone Star State!

Photos by Carl Nelson

Fashion with Chris

February 18, 2011
Chris Has Agreed to Offer His Fashion Services

Time Limited Offer:

Editor’s Note:  Chris is a bit tired from the Holidays and has decided to forgo the New York to Paris to Milan fashion tour this year.  Instead, he thinks what is really needed is to focus more, and to buy more local home-grown fashion.  And to kick the thing off, he is offering his services – in this time-limited offer – to the first ten people who come forward to have their ‘looks’ adjusted, perhaps brought a little more up to date or maybe add some edge.  Or, maybe you are one of those people who wants to toss it all up! and get something a little more out of the box.  Chris can help you there too.

We discussed the price:

Carl Nelson What I WILL do… I was going to offer your ‘fashion services’ @ $29.99/hour plus travel costs on by blog. What do you think? (more – or less?)
21 hours ago ·
  • Chris Mathews Sounds reasonable.Make it 30 dollars.
    20 hours ago ·
  • Carl Nelson Really? We’re asking for travel costs already.
    20 hours ago ·
  • Chris Mathews The penny off thing is a scam.
    19 hours ago ·
  • Carl Nelson Sounds as though you think it would be a ‘shady business practice’ to charge one cent less? Sounds… counter-intuitive! But, I can go with it. 
  • Editor (me again – this blog tech thing sometimes overwhelms me):  Anyway, there it is!  First in line of course will have more luck dictating the times of their appointments.
  • Photo by Carl Nelson
  • Fashion with Chris

    February 2, 2011

    Chris Was Sent These Images Over the Internet

    Chris Takes a Hard Look At What Passes For Elvis NowADays

    Editor’s Note:  Though there is an obvious ‘conflict of interest’, as our own Chris Mathews WAS one of the contestants – we don’t care.  (Well, actually, Chris might care a little but I pooh-poohed his concerns.  “For goodness sakes,” I said, “we pride ourselves on being a tabloid… and therefore somewhat irresponsible.  C’mon.  It’ll be fun.”)

    "Blue was not a color Elvis wore much (but he was hugely BLUES-influenced), but Mike "Blue Calcutta" Weber pulls it off here, complete with exposed chest."

    "Mike Dippery chooses the superhero look, complete with big ol' belt & cape (& adoring damsels)"

    "Or you could do like Tor & opt for the simple ice cream suit with skinny tie. So many choices!"

    “Host Jim Dever shows us the most garish choices: bad wig, big shades & mucho glitz!!! “

    Photos by Carl Nelson

    Fashion with Chris

    January 30, 2011

    Pool Fashion

    Editor’s Note:  We caught Chris on his day off in this furtive video:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ihItBHbPY3E


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