Posts Tagged ‘John Ruoff’

The Seattle Celebrity News!

November 12, 2013

Editor’s note:  Here are a couple follow-ups from things happening about town:

Wanda Moats as the DUCK, appeared here with Wendy Cohen as the CHICKEN in WARP Theater's production of Scot Bastian's play, "The Other Side"

Wanda Moats as the DUCK, appeared here with Wendy Cohen as the CHICKEN in WARP Theater’s production of Scot Bastian’s play, “The Other Side”

Our DUCK Goes On to Appearance at the ACT Theatre

Our DUCK, Wanda Moats, has picked herself up off of the roadbed and is appearing as  part of a reading in No Number Home at ACT this Saturday November 16 @ 7:30 pm, and an excerpt on Sunday @ 2:00 pm. Tickets are pay what you will. Love to have you all attend and see our own quacker in another incarnation.

Flame in the Mirror Excels!

Irish Father talks to Son in Flame in the Mirror

Irish Father talks to Son in Flame in the Mirror

Also, I don’t know which Muse our playwright/actor/voice master/ John Ruoff was listening to when he wrote, Flame in the Mirror, but it has broken all box office records for the Eclectic Theater during its run there after a great critical write-up in “Drama in the Hood”:http://www.dramainthehood.net/2013/10/flame-in-the-mirror/

John may have been listening to the right Muse this time.

John may have been listening to the right Muse this time.

Photos by Carl Nelson

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Seattle Celebrity News!

September 8, 2012

Champagne and Duck (well… chicken) Were Served

SAVE THE DUCK! BENEFIT IS A BIG SUCCESS!!

Warp Productions has done it again, with a big save for the Odd Duck.  Hundreds of dollars  were reportedly made.  Culture (and duck) was served.  And all sorts of luminaries were there, both onstage and off.  Here are a few of the highlights:

Photos by Carl Nelson

From the Editor’s Perch…

June 23, 2012

 

Does Art Make You a Better Person?

A lot of people, mostly artists I’ve noticed, say it does.   And it’s usually only artists – or people in arts related careers, who are pitching for a fuller revenue stream  – who broach this topic.  You rarely hear of a lawyer, or a garbage collector, or a plumber, or a cop, or a mayor, or any of any number of professions raise this question about themselves.  They seem to take it for granted that being paid for doing something useful is worthwhile, and hopefully, that participating in life in this capacity makes them a better person.  But it may not.  That’s the way it goes.  A person has to get the food on the table. 

However, artists have a lot of trouble even ‘getting food to the table’.  So another reason to justify doing what they are doing seems necessary.  Personally, I would keep looking for a reason, because I haven’t seen the theater turning out superior persons.  Mostly it makes them like gambling addicts who will squander their last few dollars to create a hit.  Their relationships founder; their lawns are not mown;  weeds abound in the flower beds, their homes tilt; the children either aren’t conceived or grow up a little funny, and financially the whole consortium dances right along the edge.  Actors and writers maintain that assuming the personalities of a variety of characters gives them insight into the human condition.  What I see is that it adds quite a little arrogance to their own condition.  We are always writing/acting ourselves.  Who’s kidding who?  It’s as plain as the nose on our faces – which doesn’t change.  Has art made me a better person?  I can’t say it has.  But age, and life, may have formed me a bit.

How About Beer?

But has beer made me a better person?   I can’t say it has, either.  But I enjoy it.  And so I enjoy art.  I enjoy making it.  I enjoy watching and listening and experiencing it.  I enjoy talking about it.  And like most artists, I figure out a method  of paying my way.   Isn’t that enough?  

Photo by Carl Nelson of John Ruoff/Mime

Addendum:  “There are, of course, more important things than art:  life itself, what actually happens to you.  This may sound silly, but I have to say it, given what I’ve heard art-silly people say all my life…  Art shouldn’t be overrated.”  – Clement Greenberg

Seattle Celebrity News!

May 12, 2012

Jorj plays the fighter in John Ruoff’s “Half Moon Inn”

Jorj Savage is Onstage Again!

Continuing his successful relationship with WARP Theater in Seattle, Jorj Savage appears in another ‘knock-out’ play by John Ruoff.   And this is only one-tenth of what is offered in WARP’s current production of 10 Short Plays in May.  Old standby writers such as John and Rita and Jorj, himself, deliver the goods.  But there are also several new, and very promising upstarts – judging from the plays we’ve seen here, such as: Bryan Harthorne, Betsy Geller and John Paul Sharp.  It’s a rarely shared fact, but a large portion of the playwrights who later went on to garner major productions in the equity theaters around town, first passed through WARP (or its predecessor, DAMN) on their way to the big leagues.  Maybe you ought to save some money and catch them on their way up!  There’s still room (I hope.)  The run continues tonight and tomorrow.  For more information go to: http://www.seattlecenter.com/events/event_detail.aspx?eid=418896

Photo by Carl Nelson

Seattle Celebrity News!

November 1, 2011

WARP Show Sells Out!

 

Years careening forward without any quality control whatsoever is finally paying off for WARP (Writers and Actors Performing Now).  Sold out shows are becoming the rule as WARP touted up another win, finishing this past Sunday with their matinee Halloween extravaganza, “Products of a WARPed Imagination”.  Especially successful were  John Ruoff’s Seahorse Moon, Scot Bastian’s Missing the Boat, Donna Van Norman’s The Visitor, and Multiple Vocationalities by Dale Kazdan.  A surprise cameo by our own favorite actor/playwright/columnist, Jorj Savage certainly didn’t hurt attendance.   

Especially fun was this suicide on stage via Drano, in a play written by our own Rita Andreeva.  Watch it, complete with creepy music, on this well-done video.  (My favorite part, where Rose Kinne tosses her cookies, is a couple minutes in.)  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nwgJ6dgKlsU&feature=player_embedded

To see a fuller range pictures of the event, got to: Carl Nelson Photography (link on the right) 

Photos by Carl Nelson

Seattle Celebrity News!

September 30, 2011

Jorj & Kristina Thelan

 The word is out!  our own Jorj  has been cast in another play.  This time it’s JACK AND THE SEAHORSE MOON, written by John Ruoff.  The word is – (and as it appears) – Jorj just can’t turn down acting opposite a beautiful woman.  I, like, TOTALLY understand….   For more complete information, go to: www.warptheater.org

Photo by Carl Nelson

From the Editor’s Perch

March 26, 2011

How to Make a Living

… as an Artiste’

“While waiting to rehearse at a friend’s home many years ago, I spied a title on the spine of a thick book in his bookcase across the dining room table.   I thought it read, “Foundations of Paradise”.  Thinking that this sounds like the title of a great novel!  I must have somehow missed the existence of, I walked across the room to examine it and found what the title actually said was, “Fundamentals of Parasitology”.  Well!   I examined the book anyway, and over the ensuing years I haven’t found any other book that has come as close – to my thinking – in explaining how life works.

One of the astounding things this book had to say was that the vast majority of life is parasitical.  They made the point that if you were to completely dissolve most host animals – you would still be able to describe that animal just from arrangement of the remaining parasites.

What does this have to do with earning a living?  Well!  (I’m glad you asked.)  If you were to completely dissolve the physical structure of any business, you could probably easily tell what sort of business it was just by the arrangement and type of employees left there, (hanging in the air, I suppose).  For example, “Oh look!  There are the cooks, and waiters… receptionist… valet attendants… dishwashers… managers…  My point being, that where as we see ourselves as an entrepreneurial culture, what we mostly are is a culture of quite successful parasites.  For example, take Bill Gates.  What really made his fortune was in attaching himself to the cash stream of IBM by licensing them his software.  Think of the high earning people you know.  Do they really make that money themselves, or are they attached to something (a company),  via a nicely negotiated agreement, which actually generates the cash?

A second point I gathered from reading this book was that, whereas most parasites are hard working (in their own way) – what mostly contributed to their success was their positioning.  Parasites position themselves to be taken advantage of.  The parasite which infects sheep positions itself inside of an insect which climbs on top of a blade of grass which the sheep decides to eat.  Parasites position themselves inside of our food, water, and in our air, everyday. 

This is a very important point.  Because, for example, last night I was discussing with a fellow artist friend how he might earn just a thousand dollars a month.  He had worked the outlay problem, so that with just that small amount of extra earned income he would become self-sufficient; and he could do his work and most of his problems would disappear.  It was frustrating, how we racked our brains!  Because we felt two intelligent healthy artists ought to be able to figure a way to make just one thousand dollars a month from their work… from their talent!

It occurs to me now, that we were characterizing the problem from the wrong position.  It is the host which is the expert in earning the money.  Most companies which make large amounts of money are able to do so because they are very good at taking advantage of large numbers of people.  (I mean this in a good way.)  That’s what makes them a host creature.  They are experts at taking advantage.

So, my friend and I were working the problem from the wrong point of view.  Our real problem is not how to earn money.  That’s the host’s problem.  A good host is an expert in how to take advantage of us.  Our problem is how to position ourselves so as to be taken advantage of.  So, how we should have been putting our minds to work was in looking for a good host.  What’s a good host?  Some entity which makes a lot of money, and which does the sort of thing you’d like to do!  Then you just position yourself nearby as possible –  and try to look vulnerable and attractive.   That is: hard-working, reliable, talented, smart, great attitude, friendly… and most importantly, available.  “Most of being successful, is just showing up,” as Woody Allen says.

A lot of artists get their back up at this suggestion.  Especially women artists.  They stubbornly resist any attempts to take advantage of them.  It becomes a big moral quandary.  I think this is wrong headed.  They should think more like Bob Dylan who said he’d ‘snuck in while the door was open – and now they can’t get rid of me.’ 

Photo by Carl Nelson  (model is John Ruoff)

Moliere

May 20, 2010

John Ruoff as Moliere

Poem by Carl Nelson/Photo by Carl Nelson/Voice by John Ruoff

Oh, the Spring! (Mole’s Song)

May 4, 2010

Photo/Poster by Carl Nelson

Poem by Carl Nelson / Voice of John Ruoff

The Midnight Mystery Theater

March 27, 2010
The Midnight Mystery Players
The Midnight Mystery Players

The Midnight Mystery Theater is over 20 years old and currently  happens once a month at the Odd Duck Theater.  It’s an old fashioned radio show with sound effects and audience participation and a thousand voices and wild plots.  Written and produced and emceed by John Ruoff, this show has showcased a lot of local talent.   For seven dollars (current price) it’s a bargain.

Photo by Carl Nelson


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