Posts Tagged ‘Johnjoe McFadden’

From the Editor’s Perch

October 25, 2010

QUANTUM EVOLUTION:

Life in the Multiverse

by Johnjoe McFadden

(Final review of 2.)

Noodle Still Can't Decide If He's a Wave or a Particle

Well, I’ve finished the book.  And it was quite a read.  A little work, but very rewarding.  And for those of you who might be worried about running into God Declared Miracles… not to worry.  It’s safe to proceed.   (I have run point for you here.)

We all need an audience to help us decide what we are.  (What you see in the photo above is a ‘bark’ for help!  So please read this post and help Noodle to ‘decohere’ from his present quantum ‘superposition’!)  And apparently atomic particles are no different; not being able to decide upon acting like a wave or particle until they are watched very closely.  (A lot like teenagers, you might think.) 

This book takes a sober look at some current thinking about the relationship between quantum theory dynamics and evolutionary theory facts, and also discusses what may be the quatum nature of our own neural consciousness.  That’s a lot thrown into the pot for one book. 

 But there’s more.  And I leave you with this tantalizing quote from our author, Johnjoe McFadden:  “I believe we are now on the brink of a new adventure which will bring about the synthesis of physical  and biological sciences through quantum mechanics.  On one hand, electronic engineers are constructing nanotechnology devices – electronics on the scale of living cells – manipulating single atoms and single electrons, on a level where they inevitably confront the quantum nature of their raw materials.  Biologists are coming to appreciate the fact that living cells have been performing nanotechnology for billions of years and must have learnt to deal with, and to exploit, the quantum realm.”

Have fun!

Photo by Carl Nelson

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From the Editor’s Perch

October 17, 2010

QUANTUM EVOLUTION:

Life in the Multiverse

by Johnjoe McFadden

My Dog Noodle is Reading This Book with Me

After all this gossipy chit-chat, you might be wondering ‘how in the world did life evolve?’  Maybe, even ‘Why?’
Well, luckily for us all there is this wonderful new book I happened onto while reading a paperback bestseller ‘thriller’ by James Rollins called, “Black Order”.  Rollins, who is apparently also a PhD certified Verterinarian, finds inspiration for his creations in current scientific thought.  And so, he includes a bibliography in the back of his books.  This is how I found Johnjoe McFadden; searched him out on Google; and purchased the book through Amazon.com
On first look at the book, I worried I’d been had.  The cover is ugly, and the interior is over 300 pages of some pretty small print.  And I thought, ‘Oh, dear.  This is going to be as dry as a sacramental cracker.’  But, not to fear! Dear Reader.  This is not the case.
This book is an extremely well-written, interesting walk through the history of contemporary evolutionary theory.  It examines a couple glaring problems with the ‘natural selection’ based engine of Darwinian thought: that is, that 1) evolution appears via the fossilized record to occur in “jumps”, rather than as a smooth transition, and 2)that whereas we can fairly credibly explain the creation of a complex organ such as the human eye via steps found in the lower animals – no credible example of this has been found to account for the creation of fundamental biochemical pathways.  Also, he points out that it appears that when the conditions of life are approximated – that it appears that it is far more probable for life to appear than it is not.  These are all startling statements to make.  And makes me think that this book-review is not that far an associational reach from the Seattle Celebrity News! controversy just reported.  Whereas scientific experimentation seems certainly an excellent way of determining what is true and what is not – scientists are just as jealous of their pet theories and personal appearance as any of the rest of us.  So we must always keep an ear out for what is not being said, what is not being reported, etc.
Anyway, I’m only to page 136.  And like anythink worth doing, I’ve gotten to the point in the book where is it taking a bit of intellectual elbow-grease to continue.  But I’m finding it worth the effort, and I think you would too.  What better endorsement, but from someone who can’t keep from talking about this book, before he’s even finished?  Stay-tuned. 
And if you purchase the book, I hope you find it as interesting a read as I am.

Photo by Carl Nelson


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