Posts Tagged ‘WalMart’

Work, work, work… with Rita Andreeva

October 31, 2013

Editor’s Note:  So much for the fun part.  Now we’re back to the “grit and slog” of it, from Rita.

Not all Buddhists/Bohemians are fat.  Here is a carving of the Emaciated Buddha of the 2nd-3rd Century.

Not all Buddhists/Bohemians are fat. Here is a carving of the Emaciated Buddha of the 2nd-3rd Century.

 

Reality Check

“Oh, here is a real Work Work update:

Since no work was to be had anywhere except, possibly, in India, and I wasn’t about to move that far (well, I think, Auburn is almost as bad), I decided to obtain some sort of a license allowing me to sell something people still seemed to buy. I did an online course, passed the state exam, and got a real estate broker’s license. I proceeded to make a blog, a page on Facebook, and to post a variety of ads on Craigslist, telling people how to buy real estate in intelligent ways using my services. I was amazed that absolutely nothing happened. Silence, indifference, deep, dark matter of very heavy nothing. Trust me, dark matter is real – it weighs down the souls of millions – it is also known as the lack of money, and it is extremely heavy, it literally crushes you…

Well, so, as nothing happened, I have tried to enroll into one of those advertised free courses to learn to be a tax preparer. I called and emailed and got no reply. Probably for the best, since rich people do not get all excited at encountering a man on the street with no teeth wearing a velvet Statue of Liberty and say, “You are just who I need! Let’s go inside and have you figure out some loopholes for my billion dollar estate.” Nope, doesn’t work that way. And poor people don’t need tax preparers because they don’t make enough money to pay tax.

I tried selling used rugs (not rags, like toupees – big area rugs). It started by me going to a everything-half-off sale at St. Vincent De Paul’s and buying a pretty nice oriental-ish rug half price for only $30. I thought I discovered a sure way to riches – going to all the half-off sales at all the thrift stores and buying rugs for half-off and then selling them for twice what I paid, since it is still much cheaper than very nasty new rugs in Walmart that have such loose weave, you stab your toes on something hard and bumpy as they sink between the rug hairs. I was amazed and flabbergasted that no one actually bought any of my nice rugs yet, but they do make a very soft surface to walk on in my bedroom.

I tried putting all my paintings on Craigslist again without any result. I almost physically attacked a woman carrying a painting made in China to a cash register at Fred Meyer – I would have sold her mine for the same price!

I did purchase some very cheap old and broken antique furniture and restored a couple of pieces, but now they are so pretty, I want to keep them.

Still trying to figure out what costs less to operate: an area heater or my cat.”  – Rita Andreeva

Photo from Google Images

Advertisements

From the Editor’s Perch

November 22, 2012

Follow the Money

(Our Adolescent Culture and How Discretionary Spending Determines It)

As I stood at the breakfast counter this morning – in between the lubbity-dub sounds of my inner contentment and love – it occurred to me that the majority of our discretionary spending was done by my cereal slurping son.  My wife and I bring in a good income.  But our expenditures are quite practical.  House payments, car payments, every day repairs, utilities, foodstuffs and medical bills consume most of our income.  That’s my wife and I.  Our son, on the other hand, has little income.  But the income he has is spent almost entirely on ‘new’ products.

My son hasn’t a lot of money to spend (though he does pretty well at leveraging mine).  But what money he does spend is spent almost entirely on new culture: music, movies, snacks, designer drinks,concerts, trending clothes and sports.  And while I spend much of my money buying time in order to produce the plays, writings, stories, poems, and pictures through which I hope to beautify our culture, …what I do isn’t wagging much dog.  My son, on the other hand, devotes almost all his money to purchasing what is new.  And his money seems to be wagging quite a bit of dog! and wallpapering our culture stem to stern.

The years have shown me that culture and politics tend to go wherever there is new money to be made.  So after realizing that my son does the cultural ‘voting’ for our family, I suffered a buffeting series of revelations.

You want to change the world?  Don’t go to school, study hard, work, and learn the difficult lessons of the life and all that – because all that stuff is in the public domain.  You want to change the culture?  You’ll be much more effective if you simply go buy something from WalMart.  It’s that ‘Golden Rule’:  ‘Those that have the gold, make the rules.’  My son’s viewpoint is winning, hands down.

Finally, I’ve connected the dots and realized that the reason our culture strikes me as terribly adolescent is because it is mostly financed by adolescents; the businesspeople who make their livings by catering to adolescents; and the cultural media who pander to the adolescents ideas of the ‘new’.  As opposed to the Ten Commandments, which God knows, are in the public domain and we’ve all heard a thousand times.  (Don’t even bring them up!  you want to sell anything.)

Anyway, perhaps if I were a genius, these words might charm our culture more to my liking; provoke a change, or even get me arrested.  For the time being however, the most culturally puissant thing I’m probably going to do, is to shop.  I’ll just drive down to a Wal-Mart or one of the Big Box stores and purchase something.  This simple action as a consumer will probably wield far more influence than I will ever have as an artist. Few will follow my art, but most can spot and make change for a fifty real well.

And that’s just the way it is… for now.  🙂

Photo by Carl Nelson


%d bloggers like this: